Watch these 12 titles before they leave Netflix in May

This blend of a Grisham-esque legal thriller and “Rosemary’s Baby” style mystery horror from Taylor Hackford was met with mostly Snickers upon its 1997 release, with critics complaining that it was too garish, and over-the-top as well. Much. But in these timid times, it feels like a welcome balm, and a reminder of the time when mainstream studio movies were just ready to go, good taste be damned (pardon the pun). With an unconvincing Southern accent, Keanu Reeves plays a smitten young lawyer who is recruited (rather aggressively) by a high-profile New York law firm led by Al Pacino as “John Milton,” and yes, the rest of the revelations are about a slave. Pacino chews the scene with a ravenous appetite for a hungry man, but the notable performance here is that of Charlize Theron, then still a rookie, with an unexpectedly subtle transformation as the increasingly restless young lawyer’s wife.

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Bad movies have attracted a following of irony (and non-protectionists) for decades, but few have attracted the charm of “The Room,” the bizarre psychosexual drama from star writer and director Tommy Wisow who plays less like a low-budget movie than a dispatch from another planet, full of talking creatures. and act approx Like actual humans. Greg Sestero, the film’s co-star, turns that bizarre experience into a memoir, which is then adapted into this ludicrous history of cinematic incompetence. Directed and starred by James Franco as Wiseau, his work focuses on – and blurs the line between – bad and smart; Dave Franco is just as charismatic and sympathetic as Sestero, while the supporting all-star cast (including Alison Brie, Zac Efron, Ari Graynor, Seth Rogen, and Jacki Weaver) brightens the edges.

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Sometimes Netflix is ​​there for you at the time of need, and sometimes they just walk away from their entertainment at the moment when it’s absolutely necessary. That’s the case with the full release of “Downton Abbey” just two weeks after “Downton Abbey: A New Era,” the latest follow-up feature film, was released to theaters. That means it’s time to start this catch-up party and re-acquaintance with the Crowley family and their various servants, interlopers, and guests. The show’s origins lie in director Julian Fellowes’ Oscar-winning screenplay for Robert Altman’s “Gosford Park,” which finds drama in the contrast between the British aristocracy and those who serve them. Follow those contrasts and connections across six seasons with sharp wit and penetrating commentary.

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Everything was bigger in the ’90s, so while family entertainment in the past gave us endless stories about boys and their dogs, this 1993 hit from Simon Wincer told the story of a boy and an orca. Jason James Richter plays an orphaned boy down the wrong path in life, whose probationary period while cleaning graffiti at an amusement park leads him to forge an unconventional friendship with the title character, a captive whale, who soon decides he should set him free. wild. Laurie Petty and Michael Madsen are beloved as strict (but vacillating) adults.

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Film director John Waters brought an unexpected (and unexpectedly successful) play to mainstream esteem with his 1988 film Hairspray, a PG-rated nostalgic comedy that was so family-friendly and was turned into a Broadway musical. . And then he made his way Back to the 2007 Broadway adaptation films, directed by choreographer-turned-director Adam Shankman in theatrical style. The musical numbers are imaginatively orchestrated, the tradition of form has been insidiously subverted, and the performances are top-notch—notably John Travolta as the mother of the main character, Tracy Turnblad (the gorgeous Nikki Blonsky), and Christopher Walken in the good, tender form of her father.

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