Mental health in the black community

Mental health is a prominent topic of discussion in today’s age. However, in the black community, conversation may still be taboo. What is stopping more blacks from seeking mental help? This episode of Tawdah discusses some of the barriers to receiving mental health care and what some communities are doing to overcome them. Toy Burton of Massachusetts suffered tragedy as a teen when her older sister Denita “Diddy” Morris committed suicide. Burton then struggled with his mental health and turned to drug and alcohol abuse to deal with it. On her journey to recovery, Burton tried to help a friend find support resources, but was unable to find support resources geared toward blacks. In turn, Burton created DeeDee’s Cry, a Boston-area organization dedicated to raising awareness and providing peer support and resources. Only 4.7% of psychologists identify as black, which makes it difficult to find a black therapist. Black therapists see the need to meet people wherever they are by creating a comfortable environment and providing the resources patients need to recover. Tarsha Wiggins, a Milwaukee-licensed clinical social worker, created Trap Therapy. Trap Therapy embraces culture by creating group counseling sessions heavily inspired by rap music. In this episode of Clarified, we break down stigma, discuss mental health advice, and learn how communities can do their part to facilitate conversation for black people and black people. It’s OK to Ask for Help, If you or someone you know is struggling to find a color therapist, here are some resources to help your search: A Therapy Guide for Black Girls A Obstacle Healer – Where Culture Is Honored, Don’t Ignore If You or Someone You Know Is Having a Crisis Mental Health, The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline phone number is 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Mental health is a prominent topic of discussion in today’s age. However, in the black community, conversation may still be taboo. What is stopping more blacks from seeking mental help? This episode of Tawdah discusses some of the barriers to receiving mental health care and what some communities are doing to overcome them.

Toy Burton of Massachusetts suffered tragedy as a teenager when her older sister Denita “DeeDee” Morris committed suicide. Burton then struggled with his mental health and turned to drug and alcohol abuse to deal with it.

On her journey to recovery, Burton tried to help a friend find support resources, but was unable to find support resources geared toward blacks. In turn, Burton created DeeDee’s Cry, a Boston-area organization dedicated to raising awareness and providing peer support and resources.

Only 4.7% of psychologists identify as black, which can make it difficult to find a black therapist. Black therapists see the need to meet people wherever they are by creating a comfortable environment and providing the resources patients need to recover. Tarsha Wiggins, a Milwaukee-licensed clinical social worker, created Trap Therapy. Trap Therapy embraces culture by creating group counseling sessions heavily inspired by rap music.

In this episode of Clarify, we break down stigma, discuss mental health advice, and learn how communities are doing their part to make it easier for black people to have a conversation, and it’s okay to ask for help.

If you or someone you know is struggling to find a color therapist, here are some resources to help your search:

Therapy Guide for Black Girls Therapist
Al Mana – Where culture is honored, not ignored

If you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health crisis, the phone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-TALK (8255) It is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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